Category Archives: data

Collecting Data: How Much do We Really Need?

This originally appeared on the ACRL TechConnect blog.

Many of us have had conversations in the past few weeks about data collection due to the reports about the NSA’s PRISM program, but ever since April and the bombings at the Boston Marathon, there has been an increased awareness of how much data is being collected about people in an attempt to track down suspects–or, increasingly, stop potential terrorist events before they happen. A recent Nova episode about the manhunt for the Boston bombers showed one such example of this at the New York Police Department. This program is called the Domain Awareness System at the New York Police Department, and consists of live footage from almost every surveillance camera in the New York City playing in one room, with the ability to search for features of individuals and even the ability to detect people acting suspiciously. Added to that a demonstration of cutting edge facial recognition software development at Carnegie Mellon University, and reality seems to be moving ever closer to science fiction movies.

Librarians focused on technical projects love to collect data and make decisions based on that data. We try hard to get data collection systems as close to real-time as possible, and work hard to make sure we are collecting as much data as possible and analyzing it as much as possible. The idea of a series of cameras to track in real-time exactly what our patrons are doing in the library in real-time might seem very tempting. But as librarians, we value the ability of our patrons to access information with as much privacy as possible–like all professions, we treat the interactions we have with our patrons (just as we would clients, patients, congregants, or sources) with care and discretion (See Item 3 of the Code of Ethics of the American Library Association). I will not address the national conversation about privacy versus security in this post–I want to address the issue of data collection right where most of us live on a daily basis inside analytics programs, spreadsheets, and server logs.

What kind of data do you collect?

Let’s start with an exercise. Write a list of all the statistical reports you are expected to provide your library–for most of us, it’s probably a very long list. Now, make a list of all the tools you use to collect the data for those statistics.

Here are a few potential examples:

Website visitors and user experience

  • Google Analytics or some other web analytics tool
  • Heat map tool
  • Server logs
  • Surveys

Electronic resource access reports

  • Electronic resources management application
  • Vendor reports (COUNTER and other)
  • Link resolver click-through report
  • Proxy server logs

The next step may require a little digging. For library created tools, do you have a privacy policy for this data? Has it gone through the Institutional Review Board? For third-party tools, is there a privacy policy? What are the terms or use or user license? (And how many people have ever read the entire terms of service?). We will return to this exercise in a moment.

How much is enough?

Think about with these tools what type of data you are collecting about your users. Some of it may be very private indeed. For instance, the heat map tool I’ve recently started using (Inspectlet) not only tracks clicks, but actually records sessions as patrons use the website. This is fascinating information–we had, for instance, one session that was a patron opening the library website, clicking the Facebook icon on the page, and coming back to the website nearly 7 hours later. It was fun to see that people really do visit the library’s Facebook page, but the question was immediately raised whether it was a visit from on campus. (It was–and wouldn’t have taken long to figure out if it was a staff machine and who was working that day and time). IP addresses from off campus are very easy to track, sometimes down to the block–again, easy enough to tie to an individual. We like to collect IP addresses for abusive or spamming behavior and block users based on IP address all the time. But what about in this case? During the screen recordings I can see exactly what the user types in the search boxes for the catalog and discovery system. Luckily, Inspectlet allows you to obscure the last two octets (which is legally required some places) of the IP address, so you can have less information collected. All similar tools should allow you the same ability.

Consider another case: proxy server logs. In the past when I did a lot of EZProxy troubleshooting, I found the logs extremely helpful in figuring out what went wrong when I got a report of trouble, particularly when it had occurred a day or two before. I could see the username, what time the user attempted to log in or succeeded in logging in, and which resources they accessed. Let’s say someone reported not being able to log in at midnight– I could check to see the failed logins at midnight, and then that username successfully logging in at 1:30 AM. That was a not infrequent occurrence, as usually people don’t think to write back and say they figured out what they did wrong! But I could also see everyone else’s logins and which articles they were reading, so I could tell (if I wanted) which grad students were keeping up with their readings or who was probably sharing their login with their friend or entire company. Where I currently work, we don’t keep the logs for more than a day, but I know a lot of people are out there holding on to EZProxy logs with the idea of doing “something” with them someday. Are you holding on to more than you really want to?

Let’s continue our exercise. Go through your list of tools, and make a list of all the potentially personally identifying information the tool collects, whether or not you use them. Are you surprised by anything? Make a plan to obscure unused pieces of data on a regular basis if it can’t be done automatically. Consider also what you can reasonably do with the data in your current job requirements, rather than future study possibilities. If you do think the data will be useful for a future study, make sure you are saving anonymized data sets unless it is absolutely necessary to have personally identifying information. In the latter case, you should clear your study in advance with your Institutional Review Board and follow a data management plan.

A privacy and data management policy should include at least these items:

  • A statement about what data you are collecting and why.
  • Where the data is stored and who has access to it.
  • A retention timeline.

F0r example, in the past I collected all virtual reference transaction logs for studying the effectiveness of a new set of virtual reference services. I knew I wanted at least a year’s worth of logs, and ideally three years to track changes over time. I was able to save the logs with anonymized IP addresses and once I had the data I needed I was able to delete the actual transcripts. The privacy policy described the process and where the data would be stored to ensure it was secure. In this case, I used the RUSA Guidelines for Implementing and Maintaining Virtual Reference Services as a guide to creating this policy. Read through the ALA Guidelines to Drafting a Library Privacy Policy for additional specific language and items you should include.

What we can do with data

In all this I don’t at all mean to imply that we shouldn’t be collecting this data. In both the examples I gave above, the data is extremely useful in improving the patron experience even while giving identifying details away. Not collecting data has trade-offs. For years, libraries have not retained a patron’s borrowing record to protect his or her privacy. But now patrons who want to have an online record of what they’ve borrowed from the library must use third-party services with (most likely) much less stringent privacy policies than libraries. By not keeping records of what users have checked out or read through databases, we are unable to provide them personalized automated suggestions about what to read next. Anyone who uses Amazon regularly knows that they will try to tempt you into purchases based on your past purchases or books you were reading the preview of–even if you would rather no one know that you were reading that book and certainly don’t want suggestions based on it popping up when you are doing a collection development project at work and are logged in on your personal account. In all the decisions we make about collecting or not collecting data, we have to consider trade-offs like these. Is the service so important that the benefits of collecting the data outweigh the risks? Or, is there another way to provide the service?

We can see some examples of this trade-off in two similar projects coming out of Harvard Library Labs. One, Library Hose, was a Twitter stream with the name of every book being checked out. The service ran for part of 2010, and has been suspended since September of 2010. In addition to daily tweet limits, this also was a potential privacy violation–even if it was a fun idea (this blog post has some discussion about it). A newer project takes the opposite approach–books that a patron thinks are “awesome” can be returned to the Awesome Box at the circulation desk and the information about the book is collected on the Awesome Box website. This is a great tweak to the earlier project, since this advertises material that’s now available rather than checked out, and people have to opt in by putting the item in the box.

In terms of personal recommendations, librarians have the advantage of being able to form close working relationships with faculty and students so they can make personal recommendations based on their knowledge of the person’s work and interests. But how to automate this without borrowing records? One example is a project that Ian Chan at California State University San Marcos has done to use student enrollment data to personalize the website based on a student’s field of study. (Slides). This provides a great deal of value for the students, who need to log in to check their course reserves and access articles from off campus anyway. This adds on top of that basic need a list of recommended resources for students, which they can choose to star as favorites.

Conclusion

In thinking about what type of data you collect, whether on purpose or accidentally, spend some time thinking about what is strictly necessary to accomplish the work that you need to do. If you don’t need a piece of data but can’t avoid collecting it (such as full IP addresses or usernames), make sure you have a privacy policy and retention schedule, and ensure that it is not accessible to more people than absolutely necessary.

Work to educate your patrons about privacy, particularly online privacy. ALA has a Choose Privacy Week, which is always the first week in May. The site for that has a number of resources you might want to consult in planning programming. Academic librarians may find it easiest to address college students in terms of their presence on social media when it comes to future job hunting, but this is just an opening to larger conversations about data. Make sure that when you ask patrons to use a third party service (such as a social network) or recommend a service (such as a book recommending site) that you make sure they are aware of what information they are sharing.

We all know that Google’s slogan is “Don’t be evil”, but it’s not always clear if they are sticking to that. Make sure that you are not being evil in your own data collection.

A Librarian’s Guide to OpenRefine

This originally appeared on the ACRL TechConnect blog.

Academic librarians working in technical roles may rarely see stacks of books, but they doubtless see messy digital data on a daily basis. OpenRefine is an extremely useful tool for dealing with this data without sophisticated scripting skills and with a very low learning curve. Once you learn a few tricks with it, you may never need to force a student worker to copy and paste items onto Excel spreadsheets.

As this comparison by the creator of OpenRefine shows, the best use for the tool is to explore and transform data, and it allows you to make edits to many cells and rows at once while still seeing your data. This allows you to experiment and undo mistakes easily, which is a great advantage over databases or scripting where you can’t always see what’s happening or undo the typo you made. It’s also a lot faster than editing cell by cell like you would do with a spreadsheet.

Here’s an example of a project that I did in a spreadsheet and took hours, but then I redid in Google Refine and took a lot less time. One of the quickest things to do with OpenRefine is spot words or phrases that are almost the same, and possibly are the same thing. Recently I needed to turn a large export of data from the catalog into data that I could load into my institutional repository. There were only certain allowed values that could be used in the controlled vocabulary in the repository, so I had to modify the bibliographic data from the catalog (which was of course in more or less proper AACR2 style) to match the vocabularies available in the repository. The problem was that the data I had wasn’t consistent–there were multiple types of abbreviations, extra spaces, extra punctuation, and outright misspellings. An example is the History Department. I can look at “Department of History”, “Dep. of History”, “Dep of Hist.” and tell these are probably all referring to the same thing, but it’s difficult to predict those potential spellings. While I could deal with much of this with regular expressions in a text editor and find and replace in Excel, I kept running into additional problems that I couldn’t spot until I got an error. It took several attempts of loading the data until I cleared out all the errors.

In OpenRefine this is a much simpler task, since you can use it to find everything that probably is the same thing despite the slight differences in spelling, punctuation and spelling. So rather than trying to write a regular expression that accounts for all the differences between “Department of History”, “Dep. of History”, “Dep of Hist.”, you can find all the clusters of text that include those elements and change them all in one shot to “History”. I will have more detailed instructions on how to do this below.

Installation and Basics

OpenRefine was called, until last October, Google Refine, and while the content from the Google Refine page is being moved to the Open Refine page you should plan to look at both sites. Documentation and video tutorials refer interchangeably to Google Refine and OpenRefine. The official and current documentation is on the OpenRefine GitHub wiki. For specific questions you will probably want to use the OpenRefine Custom Search Engine, which brings together all the mix of documentation and tutorials on the web. OpenRefine is a web app that runs on your computer, so you don’t need an internet connection to run it. You can get the installation instructions on this page.

While you can jump in right away and get started playing around, it is well worth your time to watch the tutorial videos, which will cover the basic actions you need to take to start working with data. As I said, the learning curve is low, but not all of the commands will make sense until you see them in action. These videos will also give you an idea of what you might be able to do with a data set you have lying around. You may also want to browse the “recipes” on the OpenRefine site, as well search online for additional interesting things people have done. You will probably think of more ideas about what to try. The most important thing to know about OpenRefine is that you can undo anything, and go back to the beginning of the project before you messed up.

A basic understanding of the Google Refine Expression Language, or GREL will improve your ability to work with data. There isn’t a whole lot of detailed documentation, so you should feel free to experiment and see what happens when you try different functions. You will see from the tutorial videos the basics you need to know. Another essential tool is regular expressions. So much of the data you will be starting with is structured data (even if it’s not perfectly structured) that you will need to turn into something else. Regular expressions help you find patterns which you can use to break apart strings into something else. Spending a few minutes understanding regular expression syntax will save hours of inefficient find and replace. There are many tutorials–my go-to source is this one. The good news for librarians is that if you can construct a Dewey Decimal call number, you can construct a regular expression!

Some ideas for librarians

 

(A) Typos

Above I described how you would use OpenRefine to clean up messy and inconsistent catalog data. Here’s how to do it. Load in the data, and select “Text Facet” on the column in question. OpenRefine will show clusters of text that is similar and probably the same thing.

AcademicDept Text Facet

AcademicDept Text Facet

 

Click on Cluster to get a menu for working with multiple values. You can click on the “Merge” check box and then edit the text to whatever you need it to be. You can also edit each text cluster to be the correct text.

Cluster and Edit

Cluster and Edit

You can merge and re-cluster until you have fixed all the typos. Back on the first Text Facet, you can hover over any value to edit it. That way even if the automatic clustering misses some you can edit the errors, or change anything that is the same but you need to look different–for instance, change “Dept. of English” to just “English”.

(B) Bibliographies

The main thing that I have used OpenRefine for in my daily work is to change a bibliography in plain text into columns in a spreadsheet that I can run against an API. This was inspired by this article in the Code4Lib Journal: “Using XSLT and Google Scripts to Streamline Populating an Institutional Repository” by Stephen X. Flynn, Catalina Oyler, and Marsha Miles. I wanted to find a way to turn a text CV into something that would work with the SHERPA/RoMEO API, so that I could find out which past faculty publications could be posted in the institutional repository. Since CVs are lists of data presented in a structured format but with some inconsistencies, OpenRefine makes it very easy to present the data in a certain way as well as remove the inconsistencies, and then to extend the data with a web service. This is a very basic set of instructions for how to accomplish this.

The main thing to accomplish is to put the journal title in its own column. Here’s an example citation in APA format, in which I’ve colored all the “separator” punctuation in red:

Heller, M. (2011). A Review of “Strategic Planning for Social Media in Libraries”. Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship, 24 (4), 339-240)

From the drop-down menu at the top of the column click on “Split into several columns…” from the “Edit Column” menu. You will get a menu like the one below. This example finds the opening parenthesis and removes that in creating a new column. The author’s name is its own column, and the rest of the text is in another column.

Spit into columns

 

The rest of the column works the same way–find the next text, punctuation, or spacing that indicates a separation. You can then rename the column to be something that makes sense. In the end, you will end up with something like this:

Split columns

When you have the journal titles separate, you may want to cluster the text and make sure that the journals have consistent titles or anything else to clean up the titles. Now you are a ready to build on this data with fetching data from a web service. The third video tutorial posted above will explain the basic idea, and this tutorial is also helpful. Use the pull-down menu at the top of the journal column to select “Edit column” and then “Add column by fetching URLs…”. You will get a box that will help you construct the right URL. You need to format your URL in the way required by SHERPA/RoMEO, and will need a free API key. For the purposes of this example, you can use 'http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/api29.php?ak=[YOUR API KEY HERE]&qtype=starts&jtitle=' + escape(value,'url'). Note that it will give you a preview to see if the URL is formatted in the way you expect. Give your column a name, and set the Throttle delay, which will keep the service from rejecting too many requests in a short time. I found 1000 worked fine.

refine7

After this runs, you will get a new column with the XML returned by SHERPA/RoMEO. You can use this to pull out anything you need, but for this example I want to get pre-archiving and post-archiving policies, as well as the conditions. A quick way to to this is to use the Googe Refine Expression Language parseHtml function. To use this, click on “Add column based on this column” from the “Edit Column” menu, and you will get a menu to fill in an expression.

refine91

In this example I use the code value.parseHtml().select("prearchiving")[0].htmlText(), which selects just the text from within the prearchving element. Conditions are a little different, since there are multiple conditions for each journal. In that case, you would use the following syntax (after join you can put whatever separator you want): forEach(value.parseHtml().select("condition"),v,v.htmlText()).join(". ")"

So in the end, you will end up with a neatly structured spreadsheet from your original CV with all the bibliographic information in its own column and the publisher conditions listed. You can imagine the possibilities for additional APIs to use–for instance, the WorldCat API could help you determine which faculty published books the library owns.

Once you find a set of actions that gets your desired result, you can save them for the future or to share with others. Click on Undo/Redo and then the Extract option. You will get a description of the actions you took, plus those actions represented in JSON.

refine13

Unselect the checkboxes next to any mistakes you made, and then copy and paste the text somewhere you can find it again. I have the full JSON for the example above in a Gist here. Make sure that if you save your JSON publicly you remove your personal API key! When you want to run the same recipe in the future, click on the Undo/Redo tab and then choose Apply. It will run through the steps for you. Note that if you have a mistake in your data you won’t catch it until it’s all finished, so make sure that you check the formatting of the data before running this script.

Learning More and Giving Back

Hopefully this quick tutorial got you excited about OpenRefine and thinking about what you can do. I encourage you to read through the list of External Resources to get additional ideas, some of which are library related. There is lots more to learn and lots of recipes you can create to share with the library community.

Have you used OpenRefine? Share how you’ve used it, and post your recipes.

 

Personal Data Monitoring: Gamifying Yourself

The academic world has been talking about gamification of learning for some time now. The 2012 Horizon Report says gamification of learning will become mainstream in 2-3 years. Gamification taps into the innate human love of narrative and displaying accomplishments.  Anyone working through Code Year is personally familiar with the lure of the green bar that tells you how far you are to your next badge. In this post I want to address a related but slightly different topic: personal data capture and analytics.

Where does the library fit into this? One of the roles of the academic library is to help educate and facilitate the work of researchers. Effective research requires collecting a wide variety of relevant sources, reading them, and saving the relevant information for the future. The 2010 book Too Much to Know by Ann Blair describes the note taking and indexing habits taught to scholars in early modern Europe. Keeping a list of topics and sources was a major focus of scholars, and the resulting notes and indexes were published in their own right. Nowadays maintaining a list of sources is easier than ever with the many tools to collect and store references–but challenges remain due to the abundance of sources and pressure to publish, among others.

New Approaches and Tools in Personal Data Monitoring

Tracking one’s daily habits, reading lists and any other personal information is a very old human habit. Understanding what you are currently doing is the first step in creating better habits, and technology makes it easier to collect this data. Stephen Wolfram has been using technology to collect data about himself for nearly 25 years, and he posted some visual examples of this a few weeks ago. This includes items such as how many emails he’s sent and received, keystrokes made, and file types created. The Felton report, produced by Nick Felton, is a gorgeously designed book with personal data about himself and his family. But you don’t have to be a data or design whiz to collect and display personal information. For instance, to display your data in a visually compelling way you can use a service such as Daytum to create a personal data dashboard.

Hours of Activity recorded by Fitbit

In the realm of fitness and health, there are many products that will help capture, store, and analyze personal data.  Devices like the Fitbit now clip or strap to your body and count steps taken, floors climbed, and hours slept. Pedometers and GPS enabled sport watches help those trying to get in shape, but the new field of personal genetic monitoring and behavior analytics promise to make it possible to know very specific information about your health and understand potential future choices to make. 23andMe will map your personal genome and provide a portal for analyzing and understanding your genetic profile, allowing unprecedented ability to understand health. (Though there is doubt about whether this can accurately predict disease). For the behavioral and lifestyle aspects of health a new service called Ginger.io will help collect daily data for health professionals.

Number of readers recorded by Mendeley

Visual cues of graphs of accomplishments and green progress bars can be as helpful in keeping up research and monitoring one’s personal research habits just as much as they help in learning to code or training for a marathon. One such feature is the personal reading challenge on Goodreads,which lets you set a goal of how many books to read in the year, tracks what you’ve read, and lets you know how far behind or ahead you are at your current reading pace. Each book listed as in progress has a progress bar indicating how far along in the book you are. This is a simple but effective visual cue. Another popular tool, Mendeley, provides a convenient way to store PDFs and track references of all kinds. Built into this is a small green icon that indicates a reference is unread. You can sort references by read/unread–by marking a reference as “read”, the article appears as read in the Mendeley research database. Academia.eduprovides another way for scholars to share research papers and see how many readers they have.

Libraries and Personal Data

How can libraries facilitate this type of personal data monitoring and make it easy for researchers to keep track of what they have done and help them set goals for the future? Last November the Academic Book Writing Month (#acbowrimo) Twitter hashtag community spun off of National Novel Writing Month and challenged participants to complete the first draft of an academic book or other lengthy work. Participants tracked daily word counts and research goals and encouraged each other to complete the work. Librarians could work with researchers at their institutions, both faculty and students, on this type of peer encouragement. We already do this type of activity, but tools like Twitter make it easier to share with a community who might not come to the library often.

The recent furor over the change in Google’s privacy settings prompted many people to delete their Google search histories. Considered another way, this is a treasure trove of past interests to mine for a researcher trying to remember a book he or she was searching for some years ago—information that may not be available anywhere else. Librarians have certain professional ethics that make collecting and analyzing that type of personal data extremely complex. While we collect all types of data and avidly analyze it, we are careful to not keep track of what individuals read, borrowed, or asked of a librarian. This keeps individual researchers’ privacy safe; the major disadvantage is that it puts the onus on the individual to collect his own data. For people who might read hundreds or thousands of books and articles it can be a challenge to track all those individual items. Library catalogs are not great at facilitating this type of recordkeeping. Some next generation catalogs provide better listing and sharing features, but the user has to know how to add each item. Even if we can’t provide users a historical list of all items they’ve ever borrowed, we can help to educate them on how to create such lists. And in fact, unless we do help researchers create lists like this we lose out on an important piece of the historical record, such as the library borrowing history in Dissenting Academies Online.

Conclusion

What are some types of data we can ethically and legally share to help our researchers track personal data? We could share statistics on the average numbers of books checked out by students and faculty, articles downloaded, articles ordered, and other numbers that will help people understand where they fall along a continuum of research. Of course all libraries already collect this information–it’s just a matter of sharing it in a way that makes it easy to use. People want to collect and analyze data about what they do to help them reach their goals. Now that this is so easy we must consider how we can help them.

 

Works Cited
Blair, Ann. Too Much to Know : Managing Scholarly Information Before the Modern Age. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2010.